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Remember Your Dreams

Tips To Help You Remember Your Dreams

You dream every night; Everyone dreams every night.

No one knows why some people remember their dreams easily and others don't. There's nothing good or bad either way.

If you are not remembering your dreams AND you would like to, here are some tips that will help:

bulletTip 1: In the morning, write down everything
bulletTip 2: Prepare for a dream
bulletTip 3: Don't drink!
bulletTip 4: Try herbs
bulletTip 5: The first sign of success

Tip 1: In the morning, write down everything

Keep a notebook and pen close to the bed.

Each morning, before you get out of bed, take the notebook and write down whatever is in your head. It might be the word "coffee", you might be thinking of your list of things to do, today's meeting etc. Whatever it is, write it down.

This trains you to focus on that transitional state between sleeping and waking (known as the hypnopompic state). Eventually most people will start to notice their dreams.

Warning:

If you are "under the gun" first thing in the morning, this is unlikely to work. If the alarm goes off and the kids are crying, it's hard to remember anything, let alone write it down. In that case, wait for a morning, perhaps at the weekend, when you will be able to wake up leisurely.

Warning:

Some people try using a tape recorder but then find that they are mumbling so badly that it's incomprehensible.

Tip 2: Prepare for a dream

When you are going to sleep, try to imagine having a dream. Try flying. Visualize some fascinating place you've always wanted to visit. This will prompt your "unconscious" mind to have a dream.

Tip 3: Don't drink!

Don't drink! Alcohol affects sleep patterns, disrupts REM sleep and probably affects dream recall.

Tip 4: Try herbs

Try putting the herb mugwort under your pillow. Many people find this effective.

Tip 5: The first sign of success

The first sign that this is working is when you wake up and know you have had a dream but can't remember it.

Congratulations. That's a fantastic breakthrough!

In that case, as you go about your day, be prepared for a sudden, even split-second, recall of the dream. For example, you might hear someone's name and realize that they were in the dream. You might start your car and remember driving in the dream. Then the whole dream comes streaming back into your mind. It's a great sensation.

I am always interested in hearing your experiences with these techniques. Feel free to email and tell me what worked for you.

David Jenkins davidj04@practicaldreamwork.com 

 

David Jenkins 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
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